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00:30:00

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Channel 24 (225 MHz)

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ac3

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480

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San Francisco 17, Us 6, Lafayette 4, Davidson 3, The City 2, Ben 2, Ben Latimer 1, Lawrence 1, Strauss 1, Mendelson 1, Union Square 1, Viola 1, Unr 1, Clustering 1, Harrison 1, Julia 1, Frisbee 1, Rajul Pakash 1, Southern California 1, Dolores 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    April 21, 2013
    6:44 - 7:14am PDT  

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, you say, "that's so emma and julia." who says that? everyone. announcer: imagine if who you are were used as an insult. 88. we are at mount davidson and it has the highest point of elevation in san francisco hitting a whopping 928 feet. mt. davidson provides a peaceful
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30-acre owe ace and great hiking trails. the spectacular views offers a perfect place to watch the sunrise or suffer sun set with someone you louvre, wear sturdy shows to conquer the stone trails and denly inventory advantage gives you hikers the sensation of being in a rain forest it's quite a hike to the top here at mount davidson but the view >> hi, i'm with building san francisco. and we have a special program of stay safe today where we're going to talk about what you can do to your home after an earthquake to make it waterproof and to be more comfortable. we're here at spur in san
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francisco, this wonderful exhibit of safe enough to stay. and this is an example of what your home might be like after an earthquake. and we have today with us ben latimer from tvan. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> we'll talk about things you can do you don't have to be a professional contractor to make your home more livable after an earthquake. >> i want to talk about things a homeowner can do. we have comfort and we have things like a little bit of maybe safety if your front door is ajar and waterproofing if you have a leak in your roof, or if you have broken glass on the window. >> so unr, one of the most important fib use is keeping outside out and inside in. let's look at windows. >> let's assume this window is broken in the earthquake. we have wind and rain blowing in. one of the most important things you need to do as a homeowner is secure the plastic properly. if you just take staples or nails and put them into the
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plastic, we're going to get a strong wind and rip it right off. what i'm going to have somebody do is they're going to have -- this is an old piece of shingle. you might have -- everybody has a piece of wood in their basement. it doesn't have to be fancy. they take out this rusty screw begun, and hopefully you have one of these. >> there is one at the neighborhood support center. >> at the neighborhood support center. you're going to wrap this plastic around this board, take your screw. and then screw that in. >> you need a permit for this? >> you do need a permit for this. and you can contact the former head building inspector to get that permit. that's it. now when the wind blows, it's tight and it's not going to pull through, having a single point of contact. >> great. what about this door? take a look at this door. what can you do? let's say it doesn't shut tight. what can you do? >> for the sake of argument, we're on the inside. i can't lock my door at night.
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i have a very similar, very similar idea. i'm going to take my 2 by 4. i can put it across the jamb in the door. one. two. maybe i want another one up here, maybe another one down there. but i can go to sleep. and that quickly, i can get it off in the morning. >> terrific. what about the roof up here? we see people throw blue tarps over their roof after an earthquake. that seems reasonable. >> i think the blue tarp is reasonable. the things that people want to know that they need to know is if you have multiple tarps, how you overlap. starting from the bottom and moving up so that you're overlapping this way. so, rain running down doesn't slide under your tarp. >> right. >> and the same technique we did over here, as silly as it may sound, wrapping the end of that blue tarp with your board and then securing that if you
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can underneath, if you have to on top is fine. but making sure that you don't have an area where the wind is going to get under and bill owe that tarp. >> the wind can rip it right off. >> and then you're back up there again. >> let's go inside and check out what we can do inside. >> old fun. here we go. >> so, ben, i see you have nails, universal tool right here. >> man's best friend. duct tape. let me show you a couple things we can use this for after an earthquake. this window right here, because it's off kilter, we have open seams all along. i have a lot of air coming through. i want to stay comfortable at night. i want to keep that air out. it's as simple as that, all the way around. >> excellent. >> now i don't have any air coming in. let's say this one is one that would annoy me. everything is a little off. my doors won't stay closed. i take a piece of my favorite duct tape here, close it up. and at least it will stay out of my way when i'm trying to live throughout my day. if we're not talking about
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pressurized water, we're talking about just the drain, sometimes they're going to get a crack here. >> right, sure. >> and you're going to get a leak. duct tape around that is going to help us get through until we can get a plumber out and get that fixed as well. let's say we only have electricity in one room, so we're running extension cords across the house. if i'm going to run an extension cord from one room to the other, i don't want kids tripping on it. i don't want to trippon it. i take my trusty duct tape, tape it to the floor, and i don't have to worry about it getting kicked. >> great, great. look at this. let's look at the duct tape here because we see a big -- >> yes. in the event of an earthquake, i don't think we're going to have too many -- too much debris that's safe to put into a plastic bag, even as strong as it might be. these are called vice bags. this is what they use to put rice and things when they ship it. this is something where i take my glass, i can take broken pieces of wood, i can take anything sharp and fill it. and it's not going to puncture
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and come out. it's not going to fall all over the floor. i've not going to have it sticking out, maybe scratch myself, cut myself or anything like that. these are a great thing to have. >> you have a little go-to box for emergencies. that's great. thanks very much for joining us, ben. it's really been interesting. and i want to thank you all for joining us here at the spur urban center. and we'll see you again (music) >> herb theatre,open rehearsal. listen to the rehearsal. i think it is fun for them, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk
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(music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i thought everyone should know that. this was my purpose. and after we opened, which was a spectacular opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed
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slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy.
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they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you look at the first of the program you have very early, young vibrant mendelson; fabulous opener and then you have this fabulous concerto written for us in the orchestra. is our gift.
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msk(music) >> and then you have strauss, extraordinary piece. the most challenging of all. string orchestra work. 23 solo instrument, no violin section, now viola section; everybody is responsible for their part in this piece. the challenge is something that i felt not only that we could do , absolutely could do, but i wanted to show off. i can't tell you how aware i am of the audience. not only what i hear but their vibes, so strong.
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i have been doing this for a long time. i kind of make them feel what i want them to feel. there is nobody in that audience or anywhere that is not going to know that particular song by the fourth note. and that is our encore on tour. by the way. i am proud to play it, we are from san francisco. we are going to play that piece no matter where we are. come and experience lafayette park and enjoy the people, picnic and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take an afternoon stroll with your loved one hand in hand.
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located at got and sacramento street in the middle of pacific heights on top of the city's steep rolling hills, lafayette park offers a great place, peaceful beauty. comfortably spaced tables and benches, a playground, rest rooms and tips at the end of the park. plenty of flat areas for football, frisbee, and picnic. lafayette is very much a couples park. this wonderful hilltop park is the place you can share with someone you cherish. lafayette park is located along the round at the one end campus and also easy
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>> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100
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facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have your app. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some
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children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here.
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for me, i'm a dog owner. maybe i want to take the kids as well. and i want to find a park that has all of these things. i filter, i go back. i'll find which ones are the closest via the list or the map view. and then when you actually go ahead and click on any of these parks, you'll be brought to -- you should be brought to the ones that have actual dog parks and the other filters that were put on the picnic area. so, there you see you've got dog play area, picnic area. additionally, there's feedback that can be pushed through this. any reservations for the picnic areas in park and rec, golden
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gate park has quite a few. you can actually go ahead and begin to do reservations on here. you just choose your picnic table and go through this. you can also search for whatever it is that you're looking for. if you're looking for dolores park, we just did a search for dolores, brings you right to it. you can go inside and take a look at what's available there. and you can also get directions. zoom back in on this. and, so, very simple, just direction. does anyone have any questions? okay. we've got about 8 minutes until we've got the mayor coming on. so -- >> [inaudible].
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>> hi, i'm the founder and ceo of apple-liscious. a couple things to talk about for the mobile app. we built the platform for the department of rec and park. looking towards the future, which is really kind of what bill ginsler was doing, making information first, but second, adding the financial component, making transactions which we have built into the mobile commerce platform with the hierarchical structure from the top down, enabling the city to actually manage all of their own financial transactions. from ticketing, reservations, permitting, just about every component you can think of, of interacting with the city as a business itself, which most people -- which is kind of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open
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data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done
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before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly
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how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how
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many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help public service, like the fire department, the police department, the mta know more about how people move around. so, we're providing crowd data. so, if a thousand people pass one of our sensors in an hour, that data will be available publicly. every month. so, chris, do you want to go a little deeper? >> you can see we have a lot of blocks around union square covered. when you show this data to property owners and real estate agents and to retailers, they want to know more about how much -- how many people walk in front of their store every day, kind of the story -- the way i thought of the idea was standing in my balcony looking down at walgreens and realizing they had no idea how many people pass their store every day. they don't know that, how do they know if they're successful because the weather is nice, or
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because they did something right. so, you want to go into business hours? the wi-fi store here. so, one of our clients is saks fifth avenue and we end up giving them some really great charts about how many people pass while they're open. so, you can see here. these are the hours that they're open. and the dark areas are the hours that they're closed. and if they're open from 10:00 to 7:00 p.m., they capture 81% of the people that walk by. so, that might mean that they want to move their hours one way or the other and capture more people, or stay the same. and it's just data they didn't have before. and i think you can imagine what 5% more people, more customers to a big retailer would be in revenue. i can't tell if they're trying
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to cut me short or telling me to keep going. [laughter] >> this wasn't even -- this wasn't even part of it. i guess people are just late. so, i get up here. all right. yeah, so, if you go down and in our interface, this is a web app that's available to all our customers, you can see here the busiest day in san francisco is friday. the busiest time, the busiest hour on average is 1:00 to 2:00 p.m.. on september 14th was the busiest day of last month. and the people can line this data up with their sales data or with public transit or anything they're looking at and they'll be able to figure out real quickly if there's a correlation. and if there's more pedestrians, less pedestrians. what? >> [inaudible]. >> i'm sorry? >> [inaudible]. >> so, this is a tool that we're developing based on the
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data that we're announcing today. you can see them over here a little bit better. but you can see that to most departments, most agencies in san francisco, the city, most agencies, they'll be able to use this in a real way. they'll be able to look -- police can look at an interface and be able to see exactly how many people are in these areas that they might have to go to -- kind of wrap up now, i guess. no, i can't. so, you know, and we can also show predictive data about when the giants are going to be playing. so, anyway, you can come over for a demo later. i think we'll be on a panel later. now i think it's the mayor's turn. (applause) >> okay, everybody, [speaker not understood]. we've actually been working with the city the past few weeks to try and consume some of the data that's a part of the data sf data repository and tell a story about urban
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growth. so, this is a mapping platform that allows you to not only visualize your data like you see here, but also ask questions of your data. and i'm pulling data from multiple data sources. here we have data from the city. we also have data from private data sources that read -- not going to mess with it. there's one of the variables now, the bottom you see there is median household income. we're pulling in all these different data sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has
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the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started visualizing on the map the slow and more rapid growth of residential -- residential property in soma and then in 2011 you just saw obviously a huge residential boom in the downtown area. so, we've just actually -- we're a company in southern california. we just relocated up here, small little office in san francisco, trying to better understand the community moving at a fast pace here. part of doing that is working with the city and better understanding how we can support open data. so, thank you. (applause)
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>> good morning, everybody. can you hear me? good morning and welcome to the hatchery. this is our newest space. my name is rajul pakash, i'm one of the founders. along with my other partners, chris and richy in the back, and lawrence who could not make it. welcome to 6 45 harrison and the hatchery. it's super exciting to have such a dynamic group of people from both the public and private sector here today. and as a self-proclaimed geek and tech entrepreneur, this is really exciting for me. before i wax on about that's correct really quickly want to give you just a quick 90-second thing about the hatchery. we opened our doors about a year ago at 625 2nd street, bought 21 thou square feet there. we opened our doors and within a year we've grown into a whole new space which we opened two months ago. * across both spaces we have